Home » Protocols For In Vitro Propagation Of Ornamental Plants by Sergio J. Ochatt
Protocols For In Vitro Propagation Of Ornamental Plants Sergio J. Ochatt

Protocols For In Vitro Propagation Of Ornamental Plants

Sergio J. Ochatt

Published December 1st 2009
ISBN : 9781603273909
Hardcover
400 pages
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 About the Book 

It was around 1970, I had just completed a 5-year breeding project aiming at fxing fower colour in gerbera progenies: white, yellow, pink, and red- colour homogeneity was sound, but size and shape still required some improvement. The problem wasMoreIt was around 1970, I had just completed a 5-year breeding project aiming at fxing fower colour in gerbera progenies: white, yellow, pink, and red- colour homogeneity was sound, but size and shape still required some improvement. The problem was defnitely resolved by Murashige and Skoog, USA who published a reliable protocol for gerbera micropro- gation. In short, my gerbera seed lines were immediately rendered obsolete by this e- cient cloning system, able to produce millions of plants of a matchless and previously unknown homogeneity, the uniformity of fower shape and colour being the basic requi- ments for the market. The success of micropropagation resulted in a tremendous growth in gerbera fower production worldwide, and this species conquered a leading place in the foriculture industry. This personal experience stresses the impact of micropropagation on the genetic improvement research strategies in ornamentals. Micropropagation has become in- sive, especially in ornamental plant material issues. Today, hundreds of protocols exist- however, only a modest percentage of them are exploited economically. Thus, only micropropagation of plants with a high market price range, like orchids for instance, has proved cost-effective and achieved great success. Micropropagation is a labour-intensive system: hand-power is estimated to rep- sent 60-70% of total costs. This explains the outsourcing of the major labs in developing countries where labour is cheaper. Nevertheless, certain industrial protocols remain a proprietary technology of leading labs, mostly western, with the exception of Japan and Taiwan.