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The Miners of Northumberland and Durham, a History of Their Social and Political Progress Richard Fynes

The Miners of Northumberland and Durham, a History of Their Social and Political Progress

Richard Fynes

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230373928
Paperback
112 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1873 edition. Excerpt: ... refers to binding timeMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1873 edition. Excerpt: ... refers to binding time in the following lines of The Pitmans Pay -- Just like wor maisters when wor bun, If men and lads be verra scant, They wheedle us wi yel and fun, And coax us into what they want. But myek yor mark, then snuffs and sneers Suin stop yor gob and lay yor braggin- When yence yor feet are i the geers, Maw soul, they keep yor paunches waggin. CHAPTER IV, THE CO-OPEBATIVE MOVEMENT, AND HEPBURNS UNION. From the settlement of the strike about the binding time things went on peaceably, and nothing occurred worthy of being recorded till the year 1825, when there was an attempt made to carry out a great social reform. Boys at this time used to be from seventeen to eighteen hours a day in the mine. Allowed to go down at the early, and almost infantile age of six years, the whole of their youthful days were spent in the dismal mine till they became 21 years of age- and, during the whole of this long period, as we have already remarked, they hardly ever saw the happy, health-giving daylight and sunshine, except at short intervals. There were no schools, and no time to attend them had there been so that education amongst miners in those days was out of the question, with the exception of one here and there. Amongst the few, however, there was one bold, honest, intelligent man, named Mackintosh, who was a miner, and felt the degraded state of his fellow-men, and who set about the great social work of co-operation, with a view to the amelioration of himself and his companions. Like Galileo, however, he lived before his time. A commencement was made at Hetton, in the County of Durham, on the co-operative principle, but it soon failed, and it cannot be wondered at, when the prejudice and the ignorance that prevailed at this...